Saturday, March 05, 2011

Current Project: Release of A St. Patrick's Day Tale
Status: Book signing on March 17, hope to see everyone there.

I’m late, I’m late, I’m late for a very important date—again. My apologies ladies, Friday is very hard for me. No excuses, I just forgot (even with the nice reminder).

I’m not sure I have any words of wisdom on this topic. I’m trying very hard not to feel brain dead. I looked at all of the wonderful postings and it didn’t help stir the vacant recesses of my mind. I’m looking forward to taking all of the delightful on line classes offered by the MWVRWA, but just don’t have the time right now.

Looking at word building, yes it is wonderful and the descriptions are so enhanced when an author’s creativity shines through. But as with anything else, this magnificent technique can be overdone. There is always a fine line between pleasing and dragging on and on and on forever. I understand that some readers enjoy long descriptions. But we must all remember that the descriptions as with everything else must move the story forward. A description, no matter how brilliant, may be a bunch of marvelous words on a piece of paper and might not serve a function.
I like to see descriptions from the POV of the character. What does your character see when he/she enters a room for the first time? What pops into the head when the heroine is seen by the hero for the first time—and vice versa? These are incredibly important and deserve time in the book. How they are perceived by the other will most likely change as their relationship progresses.

What descriptions are important to you? And what is not?

3 comments:

Sarah Raplee said...

LOL Chris, now I won't feel so bad if I forget!
You said, "we must all remember that the descriptions as with everything else must move the story forward. A description, no matter how brilliant, may be a bunch of marvelous words on a piece of paper and might not serve a function." So true!

I believe description, like dialogue, should serve at least three necessary functions (out of the many possible.)

These are examples of descriptions I feel are important: First time in a setting that plays in more than one scene, first impressions of a character (as you mentioned), to build tension or establish the tone of the story or the scene. There are many others.

Paty Jager said...

I agree, description can be over done, but if you know your book's world and can give little snippets of it to the reader and they can then build around that what they see through our story I think it's better than giving every little detail and having them try to remember your world exactly when they can use their own imagination and see it in their own minds their way and it become more real.

Genene Valleau said...

Gah! Had a "brilliant" comment and blogger ate it.

So just will say these are words of wisdom, Chris.

I've cut entire scenes that I thought were totally entrancing but didn't move the story forward. And really appreciate the reminder to write descriptions from the POV character. Guys see thing differently than women and, as you said, their perspective can change as the relationship changes.

So thank you!